Career Services

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University Life & Services

ULS

Welcome UB Alumni!

Welcome UB alumni! UB Career Services is pleased to offer alumni a variety of lifetime career services, tools, and resources. We hope you will find this information helpful whether you have recently graduated, are looking to enhance your skills and training, or are ready to make a career change.

Services for UB Alumni

Up to 1 year after graduation

More than 1 year after graduation

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Job Searching

Preparing for the Job Search

An effective job search requires thoughtful planning and preparation. Begin by making sure your professional documents are in order, including a resume, cover letter, and in some cases a portfolio, research statement, or other industry-specific items. The links below can you guide you as you polish off your materials.

Establishing your Job Search Network

Did you know that more than 80% of job offers are secured through some form of networking? Tapping into your web of contacts and continually working to increase and expand those connections is key in today's changing job market. The links below can help you in continuing to enhance your network community.

  • UB Mentor Network: connect with career professionals in a variety of fields or consider becoming a career mentor yourself!
  • UB Alumni Association External Site Link Icon : check out the Alumni Connections section to join a social network, view alumni chapters by geographic region, or locate a long-lost college friend.
  • LinkedIn External Site Link Icon : world's largest professional network. Join the UB Alumni Association LinkedIn Group!

Job Searching Online Tools

The Internet, when used properly, is a great resource for your job search. If you’re using online search engines or job boards, remember that targeted, discipline-specific sites tend to be best. At the same time, it can be advantageous to keep an open mind when evaluating positions, as the job title or category is not as important as the content, skills needed, and overall fit of the position. In addition, take a proactive approach in researching companies of interest directly, and use a variety of online tools and resources.

Interviewing

Interviewing has changed substantially in recent years. Gone are the days of the standard "What are your strengths?" questions. More and more, employers want to see evidence of past behavior, successes, and challenges. Some companies are even incorporating problem-solving or brain-teaser scenarios into interviews to evaluate candidates' critical thinking and reasoning skills. Prepare by practicing a wide range of interview questions so that you are not caught off guard if you are asked to calculate how many gas stations there are in the United States!

If you are an experienced professional looking to advance or switch career paths, explaining that next move may be challenging. It is critical to craft your unique career story. Summarize your past work history, professional identity, and your newly defined interests and goals.

Evaluating Job Offers

Congratulations! You've been offered a job! Now it's time to weigh that offer. Remember that a job offer is not just about the salary. Benefits, health care, retirement options, vacation time and other hidden perks all come into play. Consider the whole package and whether this position meets your financial needs as well as your work-life balance interests and values.

Job Search Resources for Experienced Professionals

The job search may take a slightly different approach when you're an experienced professional. In this case, industry-specific job search engines and more targeted resources are helpful in narrowing your focus to your experience and skill level. Consider getting started with these resources.

Returning to Work

Getting back into the workforce after a significant period of time can be challenging, frightening and exciting all at once! Start by inventorying all of the skills you’ve acquired during your time off, from organizing your daughter’s Girl Scout cookie drive to volunteering on the board of a local charity. Whether you realize it or not, you have transferrable skills which can be valuable assets as you re-enter the job market.

Military to Civilian Employment Transitions

Continuing Education & Lifelong Learning

Graduate/Professional School

Career Training and Skill Enhancement

Career Progression & Advancement

Considering a Career Change?

A career change is a big adjustment no matter what the circumstances. Downsizing, burnout, and career plateau are just some reasons people change paths. By tapping into the many community and web resources that are available to you, you can find valuable information and support during this transition.

Once you have actively decided to make a career change, you may be concerned about how to articulate that change in an interview. Consider this model for confidently presenting your new career plans in your conversations with other people.

"Tell Me About Yourself": 30-Second Commercial for Career Changers

  1. Name and professional identity
  2. Last job title, company, function
  3. Something you're proud of
  4. Reason for leaving
  5. Future focus

Articles and Resources for Career Changers

Buffalo & WNY Community Resources

There are many organizations and individuals in the Western New York area who provide career-related support; from one-stop centers to certified career counselors, they are too numerous to list here. We encourage you to begin with the select service-providers below and research any additional community resources in your area. For help identifying a health and human service agency in the eight counties of WNY, contact the WNY 2-1-1 Central Referral Service External Site Link Icon at 1-888-696-9211.

Career Services | 259 Capen Hall | University at Buffalo | Buffalo, NY 14260-1635 | Tel: (716) 645-2231 | Fax: (716) 645-3829 | Director: Arlene Kaukus | E-Mail Us | Legal
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